Art

Alan Cumming recalls the ‘very violent’ childhood abuse he suffered from his father

Alan Cumming has said he felt “powerless” when he was abused by his father as a child.

the spy kids star spoke about his difficult childhood in Aberfeldy, Perthshire during a recent appearance Desert Island Discs.

The actor told presenter Lauren Laverne that coping with the abuse helped develop his acting skills.

“My father didn’t break my spirit. I feel like the qualities you need to be able to handle someone who’s an adult who’s abusive to you and you’re powerless are good qualities to be an actor,” he said.

“Listen, pretend you don’t feel what you feel, don’t show fear.”

The 57-year-old continued: “I always knew I would step out and live the life I wanted to live. And some of the people on this playlist helped me today.”

Cumming added that the abuse he suffered was “very violent” and that at times he felt “terror for [his] Live,” think, “Oh my god, I’m doing this to die.

He said that “you just couldn’t tell” when his father would become violent. “That’s how it is with a tyrant. Always at the limit. I could tell by the click of his boots as he opened the door,” Cumming said.

“Often it was to do with my looks or my hair. He was obsessed with my hair. As an adult, when I got my hair cut, I would throw up.”

The actor only lost contact with his father shortly before the shooting of his episode of the BBC genealogy series Who do you Think You Are? almost 20 years later in 2010.

(Getty Images for friends of Huds)

Before filming, the actor discovered that his father believed he was not his biological son. Cumming later refuted the claim with a DNA test. “The crazy thing is none of that was true,” the actor said.

Access unlimited streaming of movies and TV shows with Amazon Prime Video Sign up now for a free 30-day trial

register

“He thought it up. I ended up having this DNA test because I didn’t believe him, and I then had to call my father and tell him – and disappoint him – that I’m his son. And the call ended and I knew he was going to die. He had cancer and stuff.”

He continued, “I told him I thought he was a coward because I’d been the one who went to find out the truth — and [he] had used a fallacy he had believed in as justification for abusing me all these years.

” height=”1384″ width=”1845″ layout=”responsive” class=”inline-gallery-btn i-amphtml-layout-responsive i-amphtml-layout-size-defined” on=”tap:inline-image-gallery,inline-image-carousel.goToSlide(index=2)” tabindex=”0″ role=”button” data-gallery-length=”3″ i-amphtml-layout=”responsive”>

(Getty Images)

“So I got everything I wanted to say to him and I said, ‘Okay, I have to go now, take care, I’ll talk to you’ — and I said, ‘No, I don’t, I actually won’t anymore talk to you – but take care of yourself. So I said goodbye to him in this matter as well.”

Cumming said that after the call ended, he was pleased to find that he was wearing full drag because he was costumed for a transvestite role.

“It was just perfect. I thought that if my father could see me now, it would probably be his worst nightmare. Nothing I thought I would have to go through,” they said.

Cumming’s father died of cancer in late 2010. Their relationship was the subject of his 2014 book Not My Father’s Son: A Family Memoir.

If you are concerned about a child, even if you are unsure, you can contact NSPCC professional advisers for help, advice and support by emailing help@nspcc.org.uk or call 0808 800 5000 at Childline offers free, confidential advice and support, whatever your concern and whenever you need help. Call 0800 1111 or Contact Childline.

About the author

MAGASIR

Leave a Comment